House of Terror Museum of Dictatorships in Budapest, Hungary

House of Terror (Terror Háza) shows the history, practices & tactics of dictatorships in Hungary. Shocking pictures, interior design and audio-visual effects that actually evoke those awful times – you won’t be left untouched. Some of the travelers called the exhibition ‘ingenious’ ‘must-see’ ‘moving’ while few called it ‘badly orchestrated’ ‘distasteful’ and seemed to have lacked more distance and simplicity in the way the ruthlessness was conveyed and re-presented.

As it is a shocking and controversial theme, have a look at the video at the bottom to decide if it’s suitable for your kids or not. On a subjective note, I wouldn’t recommend it for small children.

The exhibition of the abuse by Nazis, the Hungarian Arrow-Cross Party as well as Soviets is placed in the former headquarters of the Hungarian secret police on beautiful Andrassy avenue. See the Museum icon in the middle of the map below (yellow M icon for museums)
Address: Andrássy út 60., 1062 Budapest
Phone: 00-36-1-374-2600
Opening hours: Tue-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat-Sun 10am-6pm
Prices: 1500 HUF, Student & retired 750 HUF, on Sundays free for students & under 18s.

See the House of Terror location in the middle of the Budapest Tourist Map below (yellow M icon for museums):


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Here are some of the disturbing visual effects of the exhibition (not for kids, please), where dead people are rolled by a machine (Gypsies, Jewish, etc.):

Some of the things that you can expect – based on a visitor’s review on TripAdvisor:

walking into a room where some strange trance music overlaid with extracts from Hitler’s speeches played as you watched some extremely distressing footage from when the Nazi and Soviet regimes were in power, it seemed the sort of music only suitable for a Neo-Nazi underground meeting.

there is a room with a dummy sitting at the head of an empty dining table dressed in full military uniform with a face projected on to it… it was creepy and totally unnecessary. Then the room where a black car which was used by the AVH is illuminated from behind black curtains and the lift which played the video clip of a man describing in detail the execution of one of the prisoners. And all this combined with hearing the laughter of people from the café downstairs…

If you are specifically interested in other communist historical traces in Budapest, check out the red flame map icons.

One Day Tour in Budapest: Get The Most Out Of 24 Hour

If you only have one day in Budapest, although it is not much time to really look around to see the sights and enjoy fun things to do, you can still make the most out of it in a one-day tour, and hopefully you will come back to see more. Let’s suppose you arrive late afternoon, so all you are ready for is having a good dinner, maybe a feel of Budapest nightlife, and you leave discovering the attractions for next morning.

Night in Budapest

If you plan to have a few drinks in the happening area, Pest side gives more options than Buda side (where the castle is). Here’s a great map of the pubs, bars, clubs and party places of Budapest. The different color-coded icons on the map show you different styles: e.g.

  • Green for Irish pubs,
  • Blue for Best – based on tourists’ feedback
  • Blue dot for Best alternative pubs
  • Blue pin for Belgian beers
  • Light blue for maybe good
  • Yellow for themed pubs (e.g. Western, Cuban, etc.)
  • Pink GL-friendly, etc.

Here’s the map, color-coded: double-click to enlarge, or click on an icon to get more info on the pub / bar.

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Whichever pub or bar suits your style and wallet more, one thing is sure: don’t miss the Danube river-view at night. It is beautiful: classical yet intimate beauty. Read more about the Best Restaurants in Budapest or the Best Cafes in Budapest.

Next Morning in Budapest

1, (7-9am) I would start with an early morning Széchenyi bath and wash away my headache in the thermal water: it’s for both men and women, and kids. Take your towel.
2, (9-10:30) go over to Heroes’ square & have a look at the Millennial monument, then (depending which attracts you more)
a, Arts: peep into the Museum of Fine Arts
b, Agriculture: the Vajdahunyad Castle in the City Park (hosting the Museum of Agriculture)
c, History: the House of Terror on Andrássy: tricks and tools of Nazi and Soviet dictatorship at the former HQ of the Hungarian Secret Police. Not for small kids.
d, Model trains, cars, planes etc.: Museum of Transport, Budapest
e, none: you saved 1.3 hours!

Follow your route on the Budapest Tourist Map: double click to enlarge or simply click on the view large option under the map.

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3, (11-12:00) take the underground to Vorosmarty ter, have a quick snack, coffee, cake in Café Gerbeaud OR walk over to Gresham Palace and have a snack there.
4, (12-12:30) walk over the Chain Bridge, get on the Funicular on the Buda side at Adam Clark square (Clark Ádám tér) up to the Castle Hill.
5, (12:30-14:00) have a quick look around the Castle District, take photos at Fishermen’s Bastion (you will see the beautiful Parliament, which is highly worth checking out but no time now) & at Matthias Church.
6, (14-16:00) take the bus (number 16) from Dísz tér to Deák tér, then the tram (number 2) along the Danube embankment up to Fővám tér – go to the Central Market Hall to do some gift shopping and or have late lunch or a quick snack (e.g. Lángos). Note: the Central Market Hall is closed on Sundays and closes early on Saturdays, so change the order if it is not convenient for your travel, please.

Alternatively,

You can do the whole thing backwards, or with variations. Start with the Castle, down to Gresham Palace (then to the Basilica or the Synagogue & the old Jewish district) or directly to Heroes’ square.
I usually leave shopping at the end to avoid having to wade through the city with bags. If you are more shopping-minded, use the Budapest Shopping Map to guide you.

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No need to rush: you can come back any time and take a closer look at Budapest. It’s well worth it: after more than 20 years I am still discovering a lot of new things to see, do, eat – it’s a city that does not let you get bored, and which always welcomes you, alone or with friends & family.

Budapest Museum of Fine Arts: Szepmuveszeti Muzeum

The Museum of Fine Arts (Szépművészeti Múzeum) in Budapest has an extraordinary permanent and a hugely successful temporary exhibition series.

Opening hours: Permanent Exhibitions are open from Tue to Sun 10 am – 5pm. Oftentimes, the museum is open until 9:30 pm on Thursdays (if there’s an extra program). Temp exhibitions are basically the same, but you have another half an hour to enter (until 17:30). The museum is closed on Mondays.
Prices: 1200 HUF (if you are from the EU and aged between 6-26 or 62-70 you can get a 50% discount). Temporary exhibition prices start at 1200 HUF, and if you buy a ticket for a temp exhibition, you can go to the permanent exhibition free.
Tip for budget travelers: For individuals, the Museum of Fine Arts provide FREE guided tours in English in the Collection of Old Master Paintings from Tue to Fri at 11am & 2pm, on Sat at 11am. The Old Master Paintings are the core of the permanent exhibition (so the free guided tour excludes other collections and temp exhibitions, and guidance for groups, of course). More advanced guided tours need to be paid. But again, there are audio tours available for 1000 HUF (both perm and temp, flexible route)! You can listen to some samples here (e.g. Gauguin: The Black Pigs, Raffaello Santi: The Esterházy Madonna, Cézanne: The Buffet)

Budapest Museum of Fine Arts Szepmuveszeti Muzeum download audio tour samples

Phone: 00-36 1 469 7100
Getting here:
metro (yellow line): Hősök tere stop
trolley buses: 72
buses: 4, 30, 75, 79

Location of the Museum of Fine Arts on the Budapest Tourist Map:


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Permanent exhibitions in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

Not only will you find here approx. 3,000 excellent foreign art works (especially Flemish, Dutch as well as Spanish, French, German paintings, graphics and statues ranging from the 13th to the 18th century etc.), but also valuable collections from the ancient times (Egyptian, Greek & Roman artifacts) displaying original works of the art of Hellas, Italy and Rome.

Temporary exhibitions in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

To mention but a few of the temp exhibitions from the past few years: Van Gogh, Tiziano, the Incas, Hundertwasser, etc. If you drop by these days, you can see the Splendour of the Medici, Art and Life in Renaissance Florence (until May 18, 2008). Prices are very favorable (starting at 1200 HUF, and if you are under 26 or over 62, it will only cost you 600 HUF). Temp exhibitions were tremendous success, oftentimes tickets sold out, so you may wish to book your admission in advance.

Budapest Museum of Fine Arts Szepmuveszeti Muzeum full of foreign artworks like Cezanne Raffaello Gauguin

Children in the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

There are regular museum educational classes where art touches children through stories, dances, creative movement, dance, etc.- not boring! Also for kids between 5 and 7, who learn about Seasons, Colors and Shapes, Stories in Art and, of course, Animals. There’s even a summer camp! Most of these programs are in Hungarian (e.g. the Sat morning museum immersion classes), so please contact the Museum of Fine Arts for further details at Phone: 00-36-469 7180, Email to muzeumpedagogia@szepmuveszeti.hu.

History of the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

When Hungary was celebrating its 1000th birthday in 1896, the Hungarian Parliament passed a new law, which said that art collections scattered in different institutions were to be placed in the newly-established Museum of Fine Arts. The Museum of Fine Arts was designed by Albert Schickendanz and Fülöp Herzog, and it finally opened its gates in 1906 (inaugurated by I. Franz Joseph ). At that time, only plaster casts were available to illustrate the complete history of European sculpture. “It was for these life-size copy sculptures that the Doric, Ionic, Romanesque, Renaissance and Baroque halls on the ground floor were designed, imitating the styles of individual periods of art history,” writes Szilvia Bodnár. Over the years, the number of original works increased, so the plaster sculptures were out, and the ground floor galleries are now used to display exhibitions of the Classical Antiquities and of 19th century paintings & sculptures, Renaissance frescoes & fountains, the Prints and Drawings Gallery & the Marble and Baroque halls. During WW2, the Museum of Fine Arts was heavily damaged (only opened again in 1949) and many of the finest works were taken out of the country in order to save them.

Museum Quiz: Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest

  • Who is at the top of the entrance gate?
  • Who painted The Sermon of St. John the Baptist?
  • Who painted this portrait and who is the Petrarch-follower depicted on the oil canvas?

museum quiz of the museum of fine arts budapest

  • When was this painting made?

museum quiz 2 of the museum of fine arts budapest

  • How many El Greco paintings can you see in the museum?
  • Which collection is the basis of the world-renowned Old Painters Gallery and when was it bought?

Please don’t spoil the quiz by writing the answers in the comments. Thank you. Drop Anna a mail if any of the answers bug you at LuxuryBudapest [@] gmail [dot] com.

Budapest Children’s Railway: A Cheerful Blink From The Pioneer Past

Budapest Children’s Railway is not only an ideal program for those who come to Budapest with little kids, or who simply fell in love in (and with) Budapest and want to see the gentle green forest, the panorama, the old nostalgia trains, and to spend a nice sunny day away from the hustle and bustle. It is also a great historical tour: going through 50 years of the pioneer history in the adjoining Children’ Railway Museum.

Budapest Childrens Railway at Normafa stop in summer

Opening hours:
May-August every day from 9am to 7pm
September-April: (except for Mondays) every day. from 9am to 5pm
Phone: 00-36-1-397 5392
Prices:

  • Adults: one-way ticket for a few stops 450 HUF, full line ticket 600 HUF (return 1200 HUF)
  • Children (6-14): one-way ticket for a few stops 250 HUF, full line ticket 300 HUF (return 600 HUF). Kids under 6 travel free. Budapest card enables you & a kid to buy full line tickets at the price of a ticket for a few stops.
  • Pets (with lead and muzzle): 100 HUF
  • Family daily ticket: HUF 3000

Pioneer working at Budapest Childrens Railway

Getting here: the Children’s Railway is in the Buda hills (the hilly Buda side of Budapest), so don’t expect a central location. It’s about 35-50 minutes by public transportation from the city center. First go to Moszkva tér (red line metro), take a tram (choose either from 18, 56 or 59 – people speak English, so ask them where the stop is) and get off at the 2nd stop called Fogaskereku Vasut (Cogwheel Railway). Hop on the Cogwheel Railway and lean back until the terminal. You are at Szechenyi-hegy (Szechenyi hill), walk a few steps, and you are at one end of the Children’s Railway line. You can take a return tour if you are only here for the railroad ride.

But if you want to walk or get to know another part of Budapest, buy only a one-way ticket, get off at the terminal called Hűvösvölgy (‘Cool Valley’) and take the trams (again, choose either from 18 or 56) for about 13 stop to get back to Moszkva tér. Or get off at János hegy, check out the highest point of the Buda hills at the lookout tower called Erzsébet kilátó, and then take the Chairlift downwards. Number 158 bus takes you back to Moszkva tér again.

I would recommend another third way to get to the Children’s Railway from Moszkva tér though, which won’t take you to the terminal, but to the 1st stop called Normafa. Take buses 21 or 90 (about 16 stops or 20 minutes), get off at Normafa, try the freshly made strudel with mulled wine at the strudel vendor, or the goulash in the ski house (both great and highly popular in winter), or some more exquisite courses at the Normafa Cafe and Grill, which has a lovely, family-friendly summer terrace (open from 12 to 24). At Normafa stop, don’t expect a building for the Children’s Railway, it is a stop, wait, get on, and get your ticket from one of the children railway guys.

Location of Children’s Railway (map icon: blue train) on the Budapest Tourist Map. If you are specifically interested in other ex-communist traces in Hungary, check out the red flames icons for more tips.


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FAQ of Budapest Children’s Railway
Is it true that the trains are operated by kids?
Yes, it is. Children aged 10 to 14 years of age control the traffic, operate railroad switches & signals, sell and validate tickets, etc. under the supervision of adults (many times former kid employees of the Children’s Railway). The train/ engine itself is driven by an experienced adult. However, the railway is not a children’s toy train – all services and operations are in line with the regulations of any other railway line of the Hungarian State Railways (MÁV).
How long is the ride?
Length: 11 km/ 6.8 miles. Duration: about 40 minutes (full length from Szechenyi hegy to Huvosvolgy)
Is there any good Budapest panoramic view?
Sure, just by getting on top of the hill, you’ll surely have some nice photos of the beautiful view. Plus, on the train, you can get an exceptionally good glimpse of Budapest from a height of 323 meter/ 0.2 miles between Szepjuhaszne and Harshegy stops. Further places: Szechenyi Memorial Lookout, Erzsébet Lookout (527 m/ 0.3 miles).
Are there any special programs at the Children’s Railway?
Yes, there are. Quite a lot of them, from spring to fall. March 15 sees hundreds of people participating in a 6-hour tour from the foot to the top of the hill: the route touches upon the major spots of the Children’s Railway and some other memorable places in the neighborhood. The tour is about 6 km in length, starting from Széchenyi hegy leading to Hűvösvölgy. Join the tour for a nominal fee, get your map and off you go. Spots are to be ticked off in order and you can expect warm lunch at the end of the tour (included in the price). :) April 12: the day of the Children’s Railway. May 25 is Children’s Day celebrated at the Children’s Railway. June 14 Graduation ceremony for new children’s rail staff, June 23 Museum Night, July 31- Aug 03 (in 2008): 60 year old birthday of the Children’s Railway, Aug 20: the firework tour on August 20 (a Hungarian national public holiday, the celebration of bread, the Hungarian state and the first king), Aug 24 Farewell party of young children’s railway professionals, Sept 13 Nostalgia Day.

Check out this great video on Budapest Children’s Railway (yes, kids still salute the train and travelers):

History of Budapest Children’s Railway

The idea of the Children’s Railway in Budapest came only two years after the end of WW2, in 1947, and in a year (strictly in line with the expectations of the government) in 1948 the first 3 km of the railway was completed, the first couple of boys and girls aged 12-14 took part in a six-week course and started to operate the Children’s Railway (in the beginning it was called either children’s or pioneer railway). Mind you, some people were quite unhappy about the Children’s railway. There were opponents: those who doubted that kids could possibly run such a serious institution, and those who wanted to allocate resources to re-build the country elsewhere.

The Children’s Railway was modeled after the pioneer railways in the Soviet Union and the former Yugoslavia. The aim was not simply a railway for and by kids, but the establishment of a tightly-knit children’s community. Needless to say, the plot for the Children’s Railway (as well as the neighboring pioneer mega-camp, also called Pioneer Republic in Csillebérc, Budapest, also build at that time) was a free gift from the Budapest municipality. By 1949, the second, more challenging part of the Children’s Railway was given over. There was special attention paid to the design: panoramic view and a tunnel were default, so they added a fancy tunnel of 198 m length to make the railway trip more interesting. The first elevator in Hungary was also built here, for the Children’s Railway. In 1956, during the Hungarian revolution against the Soviet dictatorship and occupation, the railway stopped working: but people saw the railway more for kids and families than as the emblem of autocracy, so there was no damaged caused. As the communist regime forgot to notify the Pioneer Railway management that the railway services should be resumed, the director sat down with the kids and decided to resume normal services at their own responsibility. Strangely enough, nobody made a big fuss about it. From the 1950s to the 1970s about 6-700,000 people used it per year (these days it’s about 300,000). It was extremely popular and it was a great pride to be a pioneer railway girl/boy.

After the change of regime in 1989, the Children’s Railway way reconstructed, and modernized. The communist red star emblems disappeared from the trains, the red scarves of the pioneers were replaced with blue ones, and the Children’s Railway pioneers stopped greeting each other with the traditional pioneer greeting ‘Előre’ (which means approx. “Forward!”). Instead, they just used the normal Hungarian greetings in accordance with the daily hours. Another big change was making the Pioneer Railway Museum public (earlier it was restricted to special guests).

Photos and info from the official Children’s Railway site.

Which Is The Best Hungarian Paprika And Why?

One of the best Hungaricums, i.e. real and high-quality Hungarian products is the ground rose paprika. As Encyclopedia Britannica writes:

The rose paprika of Hungary is generally considered the finest variety. It is made from choice dark red pods that have a sweet flavour and aroma. A sharper Hungarian variety, Koenigspaprika, or king’s paprika, is made from the whole pepper.

Hungarian Paprika world renowned for delicacy and Vitamin C content

Paprika is not simply a popular seasoning in Hungary, but its at the very core of Hungarian cuisine (I have also personally realized it while living in New Orleans). It is used for its flavor and for its bright color in two varieties: édes or sweet and erős or hot/ spicy. Most households will have both for Hungarian dishes like goulash (gulyás, or gulyásleves: say goo-yaash), which is the flagship Hungarian dish (alas, slightly threatened by more modern and healthy cuisine trends). If you think you have eaten goulash, think twice: most of the goulash or canned goulash sold in western countries is not resembling the real goulash (it’s like having a real New Orleanian gumbo soup or getting a canned gumbo in Sweden). Another version of goulash is made with beans (babgulyás): it is wonderful, very filling though, so better eaten for lunch to give your stomach some time to digest it.

Further typical Hungarian dishes made with ground paprika are different stews (beef, pork, chicken, mutton, most typically), which we call pörkölt (perr-curlt) in Hungarian, fish soup, lecsó, ‘paprikás’ anything as ‘paprikás’ means ‘with paprika’ so you can have paprikás krumpli (potato stew with sausages) or paprikás csirke ( a type of chicken stew), paprikás gomba (mushroom stew), etc. As you can see, Hungarian like stewing all kinds of things. I remember eating ‘fake paprika‘ dishes, which doesn’t mean that the paprika is fake: ‘fake’ refers to the fact that there is no meat in the stew (e.g. green pea stew with noodles), so it’s only imitation of the real stew – by default made with meat. Of course, an economical solution for more vegetarian days. :) What else? Other Hungarian dishes with paprika include – well, almost every spicy, salty dish will get a little color with paprika – depending on the cooking style of the kitchen queen or king (green bean soup, stuffed cabbage, different vegetable dishes thickened with roux – főzelék in Hungarian).

Best Paprika Brands in Hungary: where to buy and what to buy?

If you are not sure what kind of paprika you should buy in Hungary, the safest choice would be to go for Szeged or Kalocsa paprika. Both Szeged and Kalocsa are cities in Hungary competing for the title of Paprika Capital for centuries. You can buy it in most supermarkets at normal price, or in the Central Market Hall in decorative packaging. The quality range goes from extra delicatesse, delicatesse, noble sweet, hot delicatesse, and rose. Here are the major paprika locations on the Tourist Map (see the red signs for the Central Market Hall, Kalocsa and Szeged)

Szeged

By today, I think Szeged is typically associated with the best paprika in Hungary. Why? Probably for several reasons: a, the paprika plant spread and most paprika dishes come from the Szeged region (although there are wonderful paprikas grown in Kalocsa and other parts of the country too) b, better marketing – already exporting to western countries (incl. the US) in the 1930’s c, biochemist Professor Albert Szent-Györgyi got his Nobel in 1937 for discovering vitamin C, which, as you may have guessed, happened to be very high content in Szeged paprika. And this fact in itself, seems to have won the Paprika Capital title for Szeged. To put Albert Szent-György­i’s discovery more scientifically:

Walt­ner treated the ef­fect­s of vit­am­in A found in the Hun­gari­an cap­sic­um, while Al­ber­t Szent-György­i ex­amined vit­am­in C. He dis­covered that cap­sic­um [i.e. paprika] is the main source of vit­am­in C. He pro­duced it in a large amoun­t thus cre­at­ing the pos­sib­il­ity to state the ex­act chem­ic­al struc­ture of this vit­am­in, also c­alled ascor­bic a­cid. He also elab­or­ated a tech­no­logy for the pro­duc­tion of a paprika sort with con­densed vit­am­in C, a most healthy spice. … He dis­covered the cata­lys­is of di­car­bon a­cid C4, a basis for the Kreb­s cir­cu­la­tion pro­cess. His re­searches con­cern­ing the per­ox­ide-sys­tem led to the dis­cov­ery of the re­du­cing a­gent ne­ces­sar­y for ox­id­a­tion – the ascor­bic a­cid. He es­tab­lished the com­pound­s of hex­ur­on a­cid, iden­ti­fied it with the ascor­bic a­cid – an­d this is vit­am­in C.

Kalocsa
Growing paprika in the Kalocsa region (mid-southern part of Hungary) goes back to the 18th century, but industrial production only started in the 1920’s. Kalocsa was in strong competition with Szeged, especially in the sweet paprika (édes paprika) market. Their extra strength is that Kalocsa folk dresses are beautiful and girls look pretty with the paprika.

Paprika Garlands
I think I am lucky enough to say that I was making paprika garlands with my grandfather. It is an old tradition in Hungary and a practical way of letting the paprikas dry on long strings hung out in front of the house. Although a paprika garland is also very decorative, you won’t see many these days: it is more simple to buy the ground version (as dry paprika powder or as wet paprika cream, like Erős Pista).

Did you know?

0, Paprika contains Vitamin C, anitoxidants and capsaicin. Hungarians use paprika in dishes that you could describe as ‘tons of paprika,’ which turns out to be a healthy thing!

1, Paprika is a Hungaricum, despite the fact that paprika as such only came to Europe in the 16th century thanks to the doctor of Columbus, Diego Chanca. Paprika (or capsicum in Latin) comes from Central America. Europeans were quite suspicious about the new plant: for two centuries it was only used as a decoration. Paprika came to Hungary in the 16th century: there are documents from 1570 about the ‘red Turkish pepper‘ as it was called at that time. In the 17th century there are already family names with Paprika.

2, Paprika became a popular part of cuisine in the 1780’s in Hungary. The technique of making sweet paprika was gradually developed in Hungary from the 1850’s by getting rid of the seeds and stems, only keeping the pods.

3, One of the most popular TV channel in Hungary is TV Paprika: a cooking program

4, To make dishes hot, besides spicy ground paprika, several Hungarians also like wet paprika cream (especially in meat soups, goulash and stews) and the small hot green pepper originally imported from the excellent Bulgarian gardens in the 1870’s.

5, There is a Paprika Museum in Szeged with standard exhibitions of the His­tory of Szeged Paprika as well as the Pick Salam­i. En­trance fees are dirt cheap (at the time of writing in 2008: 480 HUF/adult, 360 HUF/chil­dren, stu­dent­s an­d pen­sion­er­s). Szeged is about 170 km/ 106 miles from Budapest. There is also a Paprika Museum in Kalocsa (see the map above).

6, paprika is NOT red pepper. It is totally different.

sources: Hungarian Folk Lexicon (in Hungarian), and Szeged Paprika Museum site

Budapest Zwack Museum: History of the Hungarian Liqueur

The Zwack Museum in Budapest shows the history of the Hungarian bittersweet liqueur called Zwack Unicum, and so much more than that: the exhibition is also the history of a family of six generations going through the ups and downs of Hungarian history. You can see the greatest European mini-bottle collection of 15,000 pieces, as well as the passport to Sweden made out to Peter Zwack by the Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg.

But we can learn about the exciting story of how János Zwack managed to save the secret recipe of Zwack Unicum in an oil barrel in 1948, when the factory was taken away by the communist government. How did they continue producing the liqueur in the communist era? How did Peter Zwack manage to get back his family business by outbidding the Guinness Group? etc.

Of course, the tickets include tasting too: you can try three different Zwack products (the legal age for drinking alcohol in Hungary is 18, so kids under 18 won’t be given Zwack products to try). The museum is accessible for guests with limited mobility too.

Opening hours: Monday to Friday from 10 am to 6 pm
Tickets: 1500 HUF (850 HUF for students under 18), but admission is free with Budapest Card.
Group visits need to be booked in advance at muzeum@zwackunicum.hu
Further inquiries: 00-36-1-476-2383

Budapest Tourist Map:

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