House of Terror Museum of Dictatorships in Budapest, Hungary

House of Terror (Terror Háza) shows the history, practices & tactics of dictatorships in Hungary. Shocking pictures, interior design and audio-visual effects that actually evoke those awful times – you won’t be left untouched. Some of the travelers called the exhibition ‘ingenious’ ‘must-see’ ‘moving’ while few called it ‘badly orchestrated’ ‘distasteful’ and seemed to have lacked more distance and simplicity in the way the ruthlessness was conveyed and re-presented.

As it is a shocking and controversial theme, have a look at the video at the bottom to decide if it’s suitable for your kids or not. On a subjective note, I wouldn’t recommend it for small children.

The exhibition of the abuse by Nazis, the Hungarian Arrow-Cross Party as well as Soviets is placed in the former headquarters of the Hungarian secret police on beautiful Andrassy avenue. See the Museum icon in the middle of the map below (yellow M icon for museums)
Address: Andrássy út 60., 1062 Budapest
Phone: 00-36-1-374-2600
Opening hours: Tue-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat-Sun 10am-6pm
Prices: 1500 HUF, Student & retired 750 HUF, on Sundays free for students & under 18s.

See the House of Terror location in the middle of the Budapest Tourist Map below (yellow M icon for museums):


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Here are some of the disturbing visual effects of the exhibition (not for kids, please), where dead people are rolled by a machine (Gypsies, Jewish, etc.):

Some of the things that you can expect – based on a visitor’s review on TripAdvisor:

walking into a room where some strange trance music overlaid with extracts from Hitler’s speeches played as you watched some extremely distressing footage from when the Nazi and Soviet regimes were in power, it seemed the sort of music only suitable for a Neo-Nazi underground meeting.

there is a room with a dummy sitting at the head of an empty dining table dressed in full military uniform with a face projected on to it… it was creepy and totally unnecessary. Then the room where a black car which was used by the AVH is illuminated from behind black curtains and the lift which played the video clip of a man describing in detail the execution of one of the prisoners. And all this combined with hearing the laughter of people from the café downstairs…

If you are specifically interested in other communist historical traces in Budapest, check out the red flame map icons.

Are You a Bela Bartok Fan?

If you are a Bartok fan and you like time travel in a beautiful environment in the tranquil part of Budapest, you must see Bela Bartok’s house turned into a museum, now called the Bela Bartok Memorial House. The good thing is that it is more than a museum: in 1981, there was a concert hall established on the first floor by connecting the adjacent rooms and the staircase. The house itself was built in 1924.

Bela Bartok Memorial House Museum in Budapest

The museum will take you back in time on two levels: one on the civil level and the other on the folk art level. As you know Béla Bartók was one of those of handful of composers who took up his boots and went from village to village with now weird and cumber some equipment to collect original folk songs in the Carpathian-basin . Not only he, but also Zoltán Kodály. You can evoke Bela Bartok, as the museum site writes:

the man who wrote his masterpieces, the Sonata For Two Pianos, the Contrasts, the Divertimento for Paul Sacher and the Chamber Orchestra of Basel, and the Violin Concerto dedicated to Zoltán Székely in the middle of the thirties right here, in this tiny upstairs workroom, originally protected against the noise of the outer-world by cushioned doors.

Just listen to this lively and gentle re-interpretation of folk music! The title is Rumanian Folk Dances. In a true multicultural style, the piece is performed by the gypsy Rajkó Orchestra in the Jewish Synagogue in Budapest.

What’s more the museum is located in a beautiful green hilly part of Budapest on the Buda side. Here is the map locator:

Opening hours: 10 am to 5 pm (Tue- Sun) (Closed on Mondays)
Entrance fee: 800 HUF (or free with Budapest Card)
Getting here: Go to Moszkva tér by the red line metro. Then take the number five bus & get off at Pasaréti tér.


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More about upcoming Concerts on the Bartok Museum official site.